Daily Archives: August 30, 2012


Classes – Tree Of Art

For the 4th-7th Grade Level Student – The Tree of Art

Ask students to draw their family tree, the trick is to go back on time as memory best allows it. As the students draw the various branches of their family, ask them to number from 1-10 (10) being the highest the amounts of respect that each generations deserves according to them. Ask students if this idea should be expanded to include older seniors in general and why. Because they are the bearers of civilization and have handed down “know-how” to the following generations…and continue to do so.

Read one of the books on the list offered HERE about a cross-generational relationship. Write a sentence that captures a main learning had by the reader about seniors. Then, create illustrations, using one or various media that might capture this idea. The sentence should be printed beneath the finished work of art. The class could create an exhibition for the school and for viewing by families, including senior members. Photos of the submissions can be sent to Lifeforce in Later Years web master (info@L-i-L-Y.org) for inclusion on its website.


Group Game: A Global Story

Love An Elder Games such as the following, A Global Story, are a refreshing way to engage elders and their friends or visitors in new ways and help build mutual understanding and bonds.

Age Range: Any
Number of Players: Any
Playing Time: 20+ mins

No matter how far away we are from our place of birth we seem to always find a place, we can call home. Sometimes, home is anywhere a loved one is or has been. We can always count on storytelling to bridge in the past and present, the then and the now. This game is designed to identify and share three things among the players, a historical/cultural fact, a sentimental fact, and a personal story about a friend/family that lives/lived in the chosen location. As a social icebreaker, this game allows us to learn about the interests and sentiments of the player, and to create a positive rapport amongst the participants. The 3 facts can be shared in the form of storytelling. All the participants will judge the person who is telling the story (1-10), the location with the most points wins. The game is structured to be inquisitive about the lives led by the participants, these stories are shared with others and their knowledge is passed on from generation to generation.

History before the invention of writing systems was shared through storytelling; accordingly, these short narrations of past events allow the players to build on new relationships while remembering their past experiences. Our elders have raised, coached, taught, and shared their experiences and knowledge with younger generations. What better way than to honor them, by taking the time to listen to their wonderful tales!

Game Object
The objective of this game is to accumulate the most points, by scoring high points through story telling. Each turn is worth 40 points, 10 points per category (30) and up to 10 points can be gained depending on the distance between their current location and the location described(more distance=more points). Players can decide on this part of the rules. If desired the distance can be measured between continents, countries, states, cities, or street blocks.

Game Contents
(1) MAP- interchangeable item
(2) Index cards- used as score board, each player uses it to give out scores to the person who is telling the story.
(3) Pen/Pencil
(4) Pushpins
(5) Ruler

Game Assembly
Distribute pens/pencils amongst players. Place map on a flat surface (wall/table). Place push pins and index cards together.

Game Setup
The game is set up the same way regardless of the number of players. It’s important to keep in mind that the players should write down then name of the story teller on top of their index card, the scorer can be anonymous.

Game Play
The oldest person in the room is the one who will start the game, followed by the second oldest, and so on.

Turn Sequence
On a player’s turn, the player will be asked to tell 3 stories/facts about their chosen location. Their location is marked by the pushpin and the distance between their current location and their chosen location is measured. This number should be recorded by the game monitor. The other players will judge on the content, liveliness, etc of each story. At the end of the round, after all the distances are recorded, they are converted to points from 1-10, once again the larger the distance, the more points are awarded. The game can be played for multiple rounds. Once the players are satisfied, they can add their scored per round and the person with the most points earns bragging rights. He/she will be Honorary Storyteller!

Special Conditions

If a player has already checked-in on a location, and another player decides to use the same location, they will have to story duel for the mayorship of that place.

Story Duel- consist on having a tie breaker, both players will have 3 minutes to name up to 10 restaurants, museums, any historical place that belongs to their chosen location. The player with the answers wins. In order to be fair, the second player will go first, followed by the defending mayor. Answers cannot be repeated, by the defending mayor, these answers will not count. The second player has to pay close attention to make sure that the answers are not recycled. The player with most answers can accumulate up to 5 points, while the loser gets up to 5 points subtracted from his total score.

Winning/Scoring

  • Player with the highest score wins
  • The win has to be by exact count.
  • If there is a tie, a tie breaker has to be played. Both players will narrate their life stories to the audience, they can be focused on their most precious accomplishments, birthdays, first time (biking, driving, baking, traveling, etc.). Each participant will be judged by the other players, the player with the highest score wins.

Game play Variations
This game can be played according to current location and participants.

Strategy tips
Players are allowed to use their hands, sound effects; anything that can implement to their story is welcomed. The goal is to entertain; details are a way to help others relate to the story! Remember that the greater the distance, the greater the score

Credits
Game developed by Geovanna K. Carrasco.
Lifeforce in Later Years (LILY)


Religious Classes – Confirmation or Bar/Bat Mitzvoh

For the student planning a ceremony like a Confirmation of a Bar/Bat Mitzvoh Student, depending on the traditions of your religion

Created by educators Naomi Baumgarten & Curricula team. Lifeforce in Later Years; www.L-i-L-Y.org | T.917-775-1199

Warm-Up Session
Teacher writes the 5th commandment on the board: Honor thy father and thy mother. Ask the class if this should be extended to their grandparents or elderly people in general and if so why or why not. These are the fathers and mothers of others, but do families help one another with duties? What about older people who never had children? Should they be honored as well? Why or why not? Ask students to find a definition for “honor”. (According to MW dictionary: to regard or treat (someone) with admiration and respect : to give special recognition to…) Ask students to write down why we should admire or respect or honor an older person. Share. Some say that older seniors should be honored because whether teaching someone to use a knife and fork or how to play the piano, and many have consoled, encouraged, and loved us. Older people have provided and continue to provide the next generation with these type of legacies and more.

Focused Activity
Students can be asked to visit with an elder (older senior of 80 years plus) to share advice about the ritual and also to share his/her experience of practicing for a similar occasion. The student will write down the advice and bring to class for group sharing. The advice given can be written on the board as bulleted points, and the class can decide if each seems valuable. Students can create a “blog” explaining their findings for October 1st, Love An Elder Day in the state of New York.


Religious Classes – How can we “honour thy father and thy mother”?

For 3-7th graders: How can we “honour thy father and thy mother”?

Created by educators Naomi Baumgarten & Curricula team. Lifeforce in Later Years; www.L-i-L-Y.org | T.917-775-1199

This project requires the teacher to help students connect to the right answers (in red) to questions that will help prepare them for honoring their forefathers and mothers.

Warm-Up Session
Teacher asks these two questions, writing on board (1) Who are the fathers and mothers of the fathers and mothers? The grandparents of course. Once this is clear, the second one should be written: (2)Should they be honored by their children, grandchildren, and even great grandchildren? Why? The more honor, the better! So, what about seniors that never had any children? Should they be honored? Did they function as teachers, guiding forces, helpers in the lives of those who needed it? Why not assume that they performed similar acts to parents? Why not help all older seniors who need help?

Ask students to write down the thoughts and feeling they have when they hear the phrase ‘elderly people.’ The teacher can ask students to choose a sentence to share with the group. A discussion can follow, depending on time.
Ask students to respond in writing: What are all of the things you need in order to feel healthy, comfortable and happy in the course of a week, both physical and otherwise if this is appropriate for your students. Sleep, nourishment, ability to hear, see, walk, move about freely, see friends, play ball, play games, respect, receive/give love, to be able to do things independently, get homework done correctly, do well in school, etc.

Then, through discussion, help students make the connection to the elderly population. Help students to understand that elderly people have the same needs, but that there are several factors which sometimes prevent these needs from being met. Children may come up with some of these: limited eyesight, limitations in hearing, mobility issues, living far from friends and family. Let them know that sometimes, with good care, older seniors can live long and happy lives. For example, we know of a senior living on 112th Street in Manhattan who is 107 years old. Let them know that CONTACT WITH OTHER PEOPLE can contribute to this care.

Children can learn that OCTOBER 1st is the UN Day to Celebrate Older People and, in the state of NY, October 1st has been legally proclaimed “Love An Elder Day”!

Focused Activity
Contact An Elder: Let students know that through making and sending a greeting card to an elderly relative or neighbor who they know or have seen, they will be adding to the amount of contact that an elderly person has. They can be honored and feel that people have not forgotten them just because they are not able to get out so often.


Honoring the Eldery with Art

For the 4th-7th Grade Level Student – Honoring the Eldery with Art

Created by educators Naomi Baumgarten & Curricula team. Lifeforce in Later Years; www.L-i-L-Y.org | T.917-775-1199

Warm-Up Activity

Write on the Board, “Honor Thy Father and Thy Mother”. Ask students if this idea should be expanded to include older seniors in general and why.

Focused Activity
Read one of the books included HERE about a cross-generational relationship. Write a sentence that captures a main learning had by the reader about seniors. Then, create illustrations, using one or various media, that might capture this idea. The sentence should be printed beneath the finished work of art. The class could create an exhibition for the school and for viewing by families, including senior members. Photos of the submissions can be sent to Lifeforce in Later Years web master (info@L-i-L-Y.org) for inclusion on its website.


Literature: Books for reading, responding to in writing, and discussion about Cross-Generational Relationships

For 4th to 7th Grade Level Students

Created by educators Naomi Baumgarten & Curricula team. Lifeforce in Later Years; www.L-i-L-Y.org | T.917-775-1199

Mrs. Katz and Tush- Patricia Polacco- an intergenerational friendship between elderly Jewish lady and young African American neighbor.

Wilfred Gordon McDonald Partridge by Mem Fox- a little boy who helps residents of retirement home.

The Secret of the Red Shoes by Joan Donaldson- a woman tells her great-granddaughter about her life through shoes.

Loop the Loop by Barbara Dugan- a friendship between an elderly person and a young girl.

Say Hello, Lily: A Book About Children and the Elderly by Deborah Lakritz- a young girl visits an assisted living home.

The Lemon Sisters by Andrea Cheng- an 80-year-old woman narrates the story of memories sparked by seeing three young neighborhood children playing in the snow.

How Does It Feel to Be Old? By Norma Farber- a grandmother tells her feeling about growing older to granddaughter.

The Two of Them by Aliki- tells of the relationship between a girl and her grandfather and how she continues to take care of him even when he gets sick.

Maxie by Mildred Kantrowitz- learning that Maxie, an elderly woman, is feeling lonely the community decides to make an effort to connect with her.

The Old Woman Who Named Things by Cynthia Rylant- an elderly woman who names inanimate objects she knows she can never outlive as a way of protecting herself against loss realizes its worth it to form a living relationship.

Grandpa’s Song by Tony Johnston- tells of the relationship between a grandfather and his grandchildren and how that relationship continues even after the grandfather begins to have memory lapses.

Naomi and Mrs. Lumbago by Gilles Tibo- 7-year-old Naomi finds a friend in her elderly neighbor, Mrs. Lumbago
Gramma’s Walk by Anna Grossnickle Hines- a boy and his grandmother go on imaginary trips together.


New York City’s Elderly

FACTS ABOUT NEW YORK CITY’S ELDERS

  • In 2010 over 1,400,000 New Yorkers or 17.1% of population were seniors and their numbers are rising.
  • In the year 2050, the number Americans 60 and over is expected to double, and one in every four New Yorkers will be a senior.
  • The number of New Yorker City residents 85 years and over grew by 16.2% since 2000, now totaling over 140,000, according to the 2010 census. This rapid growth is taxing the healthcare system that is currently in place, with emphasis on the need for long-term care.
  • Over 71% of seniors 85 and older are female, raised in a time when females were often less educated and less likely to manage family finances than male counterparts.
  • 57% of those 85 and over live alone.
  • The median income of seniors in 2010 in the U.S. was $25,704 for males and $15,072 for females.
  • According to the National Institute of Health, a number of life changes can increase the risk for depression for frail elderly Americans. Some of these changes are:
  • -Adapting to a move from home to an apartment or retirement facility;
    -Chronic pain;
    -Feelings of isolation or loneliness as children move away and their spouse and close friends die;
    -Loss of independence (problems getting around, caring for themselves, or driving);
    -Multiple illnesses; and
    -Struggles with memory loss and problems thinking clearly.

  • 50% of those 85 and over need assistance with daily activities, like food preparation.
  • LiLY’s Morningside Village program in Morningside Heights is making a difference for approximately 70 seniors, the majority 85 and over, including a few centagenarians!