Religious classes


Religious Classes – Honoring Their Parents’ Parents

For the 1st through 3rd Grade Level Student – Honoring Their Parents’ Parents

Created by educators Naomi Baumgarten & Curricula team. Lifeforce in Later Years; www.L-i-L-Y.org | T.917-775-1199

Focused Activity
October 1st is International Day to celebrate older adults. It is a day dedicating to honoring and caring for the world’s elderly. (In New York State, October 1st is “Love An Elder” Day.) Students could make posters advertising this day around the community. Students could be asked to create their own class-wide, school-wide or community-wide Day to celebrate, for example, create a potluck lunch, inviting grandparents and great grandparents. The momentum could continue all through the year as elders can be invited to special celebrations, including a religious occasions like Christmas, Chanukah or Kwanza, Thanksgiving, and more. Students might plan a sing-a-long, cook a meal, or write a play. They can also make cards to send to their own relative or senior neighbor.


Religious Classes – Confirmation or Bar/Bat Mitzvoh

For the student planning a ceremony like a Confirmation of a Bar/Bat Mitzvoh Student, depending on the traditions of your religion

Created by educators Naomi Baumgarten & Curricula team. Lifeforce in Later Years; www.L-i-L-Y.org | T.917-775-1199

Warm-Up Session
Teacher writes the 5th commandment on the board: Honor thy father and thy mother. Ask the class if this should be extended to their grandparents or elderly people in general and if so why or why not. These are the fathers and mothers of others, but do families help one another with duties? What about older people who never had children? Should they be honored as well? Why or why not? Ask students to find a definition for “honor”. (According to MW dictionary: to regard or treat (someone) with admiration and respect : to give special recognition to…) Ask students to write down why we should admire or respect or honor an older person. Share. Some say that older seniors should be honored because whether teaching someone to use a knife and fork or how to play the piano, and many have consoled, encouraged, and loved us. Older people have provided and continue to provide the next generation with these type of legacies and more.

Focused Activity
Students can be asked to visit with an elder (older senior of 80 years plus) to share advice about the ritual and also to share his/her experience of practicing for a similar occasion. The student will write down the advice and bring to class for group sharing. The advice given can be written on the board as bulleted points, and the class can decide if each seems valuable. Students can create a “blog” explaining their findings for October 1st, Love An Elder Day in the state of New York.


Religious Classes – How can we “honour thy father and thy mother”?

For 3-7th graders: How can we “honour thy father and thy mother”?

Created by educators Naomi Baumgarten & Curricula team. Lifeforce in Later Years; www.L-i-L-Y.org | T.917-775-1199

This project requires the teacher to help students connect to the right answers (in red) to questions that will help prepare them for honoring their forefathers and mothers.

Warm-Up Session
Teacher asks these two questions, writing on board (1) Who are the fathers and mothers of the fathers and mothers? The grandparents of course. Once this is clear, the second one should be written: (2)Should they be honored by their children, grandchildren, and even great grandchildren? Why? The more honor, the better! So, what about seniors that never had any children? Should they be honored? Did they function as teachers, guiding forces, helpers in the lives of those who needed it? Why not assume that they performed similar acts to parents? Why not help all older seniors who need help?

Ask students to write down the thoughts and feeling they have when they hear the phrase ‘elderly people.’ The teacher can ask students to choose a sentence to share with the group. A discussion can follow, depending on time.
Ask students to respond in writing: What are all of the things you need in order to feel healthy, comfortable and happy in the course of a week, both physical and otherwise if this is appropriate for your students. Sleep, nourishment, ability to hear, see, walk, move about freely, see friends, play ball, play games, respect, receive/give love, to be able to do things independently, get homework done correctly, do well in school, etc.

Then, through discussion, help students make the connection to the elderly population. Help students to understand that elderly people have the same needs, but that there are several factors which sometimes prevent these needs from being met. Children may come up with some of these: limited eyesight, limitations in hearing, mobility issues, living far from friends and family. Let them know that sometimes, with good care, older seniors can live long and happy lives. For example, we know of a senior living on 112th Street in Manhattan who is 107 years old. Let them know that CONTACT WITH OTHER PEOPLE can contribute to this care.

Children can learn that OCTOBER 1st is the UN Day to Celebrate Older People and, in the state of NY, October 1st has been legally proclaimed “Love An Elder Day”!

Focused Activity
Contact An Elder: Let students know that through making and sending a greeting card to an elderly relative or neighbor who they know or have seen, they will be adding to the amount of contact that an elderly person has. They can be honored and feel that people have not forgotten them just because they are not able to get out so often.